Ultrasound

Posted on Posted in All In One Day, Medical, Ultrasound

Ultrasound

Dr Jamie Levine enjoys using the ultrasound machine for non-invasive diagnostic imagery.

Dr Levine uses ultrasound on a small dog's bladder.
Dr Levine uses ultrasound on a small dog’s bladder.
Ultrasound machine
Ultrasound machine
Dr Levine and Sabrina an assistant shave the belly of a small dog. The pet's owner may help hold their pet to comfort him or her if the owner wants to be involved.
Dr Levine and Sabrina an assistant shave the belly of a small dog. The pet’s owner may help hold their pet to comfort him or her if the owner wants to be involved.
Dr Levine works the many controls on the ultrasound machine.
Dr Levine works the many controls on the ultrasound machine.
Dr Hurdle uses the ultrasound probe on a shaved abdomen of a large dog. A glycerine based lubricant helps the probe move over the skin easier.
Dr Hurdle uses the ultrasound probe on a shaved abdomen of a large dog. A glycerine based lubricant helps the probe move over the skin easier.

Ultrasound transmits high-frequency sound waves into tissue. The ultrasound machine interprets the sound waves and is shows up visually on the monitor. The technology allows us to examine the kidneys, bladder, stomach, liver and other organs to help determine your pet’s condition.

The Ultrasound records blood flow through tissues and is very helpful in the diagnosis of blockages, tumours and other tissues that require blood flow.

It is a semi-portable laptop style so we can move it into surgery, exam rooms and all over the hospital.

Doctor Jamie Levine enjoys the better image quality and ease of use.

The pets are calm and wide awake, but under light sedation, and the procedure is painless. The pet rests in a padded support on the table. The assisting technician holds the pet steady, and the veterinarian uses the ultrasound probe over the abdomen or chest.